GIS News

New ArcGIS Online symbol sets (September 2017)

Sep 21 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  arcgis for emergency management arcgis for local government arcgis for state government arcgis online cartography

Three new ArcGIS Online symbol sets for Emergency Management, Local Government, and State Government industries were released this week. The Emergency Management symbol set contains symbols for critical infrastructure and emergency facilities, damage assessment, debris reporting, and preparedness and response … Continue reading


Protect Greater Chaco: Drone surveillance of regional fracking sites in NM

Sep 21 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Articles – FracTracker Alliance under tags  articles data and analysis fracking guest commentaries intimidation

  By Tom Burkett – River Healer Spokesperson, New Mexico Watchdog The Greater Chaco region is known to the Diné (Navajo) as Dinétah, the land of their ancestors. It contains countless sacred sites that date to the Anasazi and is home of the Bisti Badlands and Chaco Culture National Historical Park, a World Heritage Site. […]

The post Protect Greater Chaco: Drone surveillance of regional fracking sites in NM appeared first on FracTracker Alliance.


If Your Private Well Has Been Flooded…

Sep 21 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at The EPA Blog under tags  extreme flooding floodwaters healthy waters private wells

by Catherine Magliocchetti EPA’s Mid-Atlantic Region is home to millions of residents who rely upon private wells for their drinking water supply.  As local conditions and weather may present the prospect of moderate and major flood conditions for many of … Continue reading


A ride to remember on World Alzheimer’s Day

Sep 21 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  causes & community google in europe innovation & technology maps

Editor's note: Anne-Christine Hertz is a Swedish inventor who works at Health Technology Centre of Halland. Today, she shares a story of how the Centre used Street View to invent a device that helps elderly with Alzheimer’s.

A few weeks ago I met 75-year-old Lars Jonsson and his wife Ingrid. They married when Lars was 40 and have lived a happy, fulfilling life together. Lars also suffers from dementia.

Every three seconds someone develops dementia, a condition that creates disability and dependency among many elderly, robbing them of memory and judgment. It's not only overwhelming and stressful for those suffering, but also their loved ones. It was tough on Ingrid when her husband suddenly had trouble recalling the memories they’d spent a lifetime creating.

We met Lars and Ingrid when they came to test a device we invented to improve the lives of dementia patients. It’s called BikeAround, and it pairs a stationary bike with Google Street View projected on a big screen to take patients on a virtual ride down memory lane, letting them pedal around a place they have visited in the past. As Lars sat in the saddle, Ingrid suggested we take him back to the city and church in which they got married. Lars’s face flickered with happiness as the church rose up before him. The expression on his wife’s face when she knew for sure that he remembered was heartwarming

The development of the BikeAround system, which is now owned by health care company Camanio Care, started back in 2010 at Health Technology Center in Halland, Sweden. We were conducting research on dementia, and noticed people living with the disease were given different access to physical activity depending on which municipality they were living in. Since it’s often recommended that dementia patients perform physical activities to stimulate both physical and mental health, this was an issue. We wanted to find a way to motivate the elderly with dementia to exercise more, in a safe and secure way.

Dementia patient Bengt and his wife Laila test the BikeAround system.

Our strongest memories are tied inexorably to location. It’s no coincidence, when you think about any big memory or past event, your first thought is often “Where was I when that happened?” BikeAround taps into this idea by combining mental and physical stimulation—surrounding the patient with places they recognize through the Street View images, and then having them pedal and steer through them. Scientists think this kind of pairing produces dopamine in the brain and has the potential to affect memory management in a profound way.

Today is World Alzheimer’s Day, a time when people and organizations from all over the world concentrate their efforts on raising awareness of this disease for which there’s no cure. Researchers all over the world are trying to find new ways to increase quality of life for the people affected by the disease. The experience with Lars—and many others patients—proves we’ve developed not just a product for improving health, but something that creates emotion and connects people. Patients often find the BikeAround solution so fascinating—so comforting—they don’t want to get off. Neighborhoods they grew up in. Parks they played in as a child. Family visits to the seaside. They remember again. That’s a feeling of freedom.

Copy of 170609_D3_046.jpg
Bengt Ivarsson tests BikeAround, a stationary bike that’s paired with Google Street View to take dementia patients on a virtual ride down memory lane.

I have always looked at digitization and technology as a catalyst to open up the world not just to the tech savvy, but also to the elderly, who often live in digital exclusion. We’re excited about having found a way to bring happiness to many people living with dementia and their relatives. But what's also exciting to me is that this is just one example of how technology can be harnessed to make a real impact on people's lives. If we look beyond ourselves and unleash our imaginations, there's no limit to what we can do to help others.


A ride to remember on World Alzheimer’s Day

Sep 21 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  causes & community google in europe innovation & technology maps

Editor's note: Anne-Christine Hertz is a Swedish inventor who works at Health Technology Centre of Halland. Today, she shares a story of how the Centre used Street View to invent a device that helps elderly with Alzheimer’s.

A few weeks ago I met 75-year-old Lars Jonsson and his wife Ingrid. They married when Lars was 40 and have lived a happy, fulfilling life together. Lars also suffers from dementia.

Every three seconds someone develops dementia, a condition that creates disability and dependency among many elderly, robbing them of memory and judgment. It's not only overwhelming and stressful for those suffering, but also their loved ones. It was tough on Ingrid when her husband suddenly had trouble recalling the memories they’d spent a lifetime creating.

We met Lars and Ingrid when they came to test a device we invented to improve the lives of dementia patients. It’s called BikeAround, and it pairs a stationary bike with Google Street View projected on a big screen to take patients on a virtual ride down memory lane, letting them pedal around a place they have visited in the past. As Lars sat in the saddle, Ingrid suggested we take him back to the city and church in which they got married. Lars’s face flickered with happiness as the church rose up before him. The expression on his wife’s face when she knew for sure that he remembered was heartwarming

The development of the BikeAround system, which is now owned by health care company Camanio Care, started back in 2010 at Health Technology Center in Halland, Sweden. We were conducting research on dementia, and noticed people living with the disease were given different access to physical activity depending on which municipality they were living in. Since it’s often recommended that dementia patients perform physical activities to stimulate both physical and mental health, this was an issue. We wanted to find a way to motivate the elderly with dementia to exercise more, in a safe and secure way.

Dementia patient Bengt and his wife Laila test the BikeAround system.

Our strongest memories are tied inexorably to location. It’s no coincidence, when you think about any big memory or past event, your first thought is often “Where was I when that happened?” BikeAround taps into this idea by combining mental and physical stimulation—surrounding the patient with places they recognize through the Street View images, and then having them pedal and steer through them. Scientists think this kind of pairing produces dopamine in the brain and has the potential to affect memory management in a profound way.

Today is World Alzheimer’s Day, a time when people and organizations from all over the world concentrate their efforts on raising awareness of this disease for which there’s no cure. Researchers all over the world are trying to find new ways to increase quality of life for the people affected by the disease. The experience with Lars—and many others patients—proves we’ve developed not just a product for improving health, but something that creates emotion and connects people. Patients often find the BikeAround solution so fascinating—so comforting—they don’t want to get off. Neighborhoods they grew up in. Parks they played in as a child. Family visits to the seaside. They remember again. That’s a feeling of freedom.

Copy of 170609_D3_046.jpg
Bengt Ivarsson tests BikeAround, a stationary bike that’s paired with Google Street View to take dementia patients on a virtual ride down memory lane.

I have always looked at digitization and technology as a catalyst to open up the world not just to the tech savvy, but also to the elderly, who often live in digital exclusion. We’re excited about having found a way to bring happiness to many people living with dementia and their relatives. But what's also exciting to me is that this is just one example of how technology can be harnessed to make a real impact on people's lives. If we look beyond ourselves and unleash our imaginations, there's no limit to what we can do to help others.


Clustering in ArcGIS Online Enables Data Exploration (September 2017)

Sep 21 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  arcgis online cartographic design clustering clusters data exploration

Have you ever had a dataset that contains too many points to see a clear pattern at the scale you wish to view your map? With today’s new release of ArcGIS Online, clustering is now available to help in this … Continue reading


What’s New in ArcGIS Online (September 2017)

Sep 21 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  arcgis online september 2017 release story maps what's new whats new september 2017

ArcGIS Online has just been updated with the following new features and enhancements. This is a relatively minor update, but includes a few key new features, and enhancements throughout the ecosystem. For additional information see the What’s new help topic or ArcGIS blog … Continue reading


FME and the Minimum Spanning Tree (a folk-tale with a happy ending)

Sep 20 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Safe Software Blog under tags  about fme application integration fme evangelist fme integrations groot

I'd never heard of a Minimum Spanning Tree until a user asked about them (it almost sounded like the title of a fairy tale or a children's book) but they have lots of uses and - as a colleague demonstrated - a handy integration with R means FME is more than capable of creating them.

The post FME and the Minimum Spanning Tree (a folk-tale with a happy ending) appeared first on Safe Software Blog.


Two Asian Map Exhibitions in the Netherlands

Sep 20 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at The Map Room under tags  antique maps china exhibitions japan

Two related map exhibitions are taking place right now in the Netherlands. Mapping Japan runs until 26 November at the Japan Museum SieboldHuis in Leiden. Its focus is on 18th- and 19th-century Japanese maps from the Leiden University Libraries’ collections. “The impressive scroll painting of the Japanese coast and the personal maps belonging to Philipp … Continue reading "Two Asian Map Exhibitions in the Netherlands"


Lidar-guided Robotic Fridge

Sep 20 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at In The Scan under tags  consumer

Imagine walking into your boss’s office to explain that you have a great new idea for a cutting edge, consumer electronics product. When he asks what is you tell him it’s a lidar-guided, robotic refrigerator that can be summoned to … Continue reading

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