GIS News

ArcGIS Pro SDK 2.0 – Post-UC Recap

Jul 25 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  analysis & geoprocessing app developers apps arcgis pro arcgis pro 2.0

Looking back at the User Conference, it was great to see so many Desktop users moving to ArcGIS Pro and building add-ins with the ArcGIS Pro SDK.  The Pro SDK tech sessions provided a great opportunity for the Desktop SDK … Continue reading


Trusted Contacts now on iOS

Jul 25 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  maps

Last December on Android we introduced the Trusted Contacts app, a new way for you to let your friends and family know you’re safe. Loved ones can request your location––even if your phone is offline or you can’t get to it. You can also proactively share your location in everyday or emergency situations. Now we’re bringing Trusted Contacts to iOS—so no matter what kind of device you’re using, you can be a little more at ease.

We’ve also made some updates for Android users to make it even easier to feel safe and give your loved ones peace of mind.

TrustedContactsiOSGIF

Control how quickly your location is shared

In preparation for a situation where you might need help but can’t answer your phone—imagine you get lost while hiking and lose service—you can choose how long to wait before your location is automatically shared with a trusted contact who asks for your location. Previously set to five minutes by default, you can now choose to share immediately or wait up to an hour.

Add trusted contacts by phone number

You can now add trusted contacts by phone number, as well as by email address. When you type in a phone number, an SMS is sent to that person with an invitation to connect. If they accept, then they become a trusted contact and you'll see their name and profile picture in your app from then on.

New language support

With this update, Trusted Contacts is available in nine new languages for a total of 25 worldwide: Amharic (Ethiopia), Greek (Greece), Persian (Iran), Bahasa (Indonesia), Macedonian (Macedonia), Burmese (Myanmar), Nepali (Nepal), Serbian (Serbia) and Urdu (Pakistan).

Download Trusted Contacts for iPhone on the App Store or for Android on the Play Store. If you already have the Android app installed, make sure you’re using the latest version of the app (version 1.5).


Trusted Contacts now on iOS

Jul 25 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  maps

Last December on Android we introduced the Trusted Contacts app, a new way for you to let your friends and family know you’re safe. Loved ones can request your location––even if your phone is offline or you can’t get to it. You can also proactively share your location in everyday or emergency situations. Now we’re bringing Trusted Contacts to iOS—so no matter what kind of device you’re using, you can be a little more at ease.

We’ve also made some updates for Android users to make it even easier to feel safe and give your loved ones peace of mind.

TrustedContactsiOSGIF

Control how quickly your location is shared

In preparation for a situation where you might need help but can’t answer your phone—imagine you get lost while hiking and lose service—you can choose how long to wait before your location is automatically shared with a trusted contact who asks for your location. Previously set to five minutes by default, you can now choose to share immediately or wait up to an hour.

Add trusted contacts by phone number

You can now add trusted contacts by phone number, as well as by email address. When you type in a phone number, an SMS is sent to that person with an invitation to connect. If they accept, then they become a trusted contact and you'll see their name and profile picture in your app from then on.

New language support

With this update, Trusted Contacts is available in nine new languages for a total of 25 worldwide: Amharic (Ethiopia), Greek (Greece), Persian (Iran), Bahasa (Indonesia), Macedonian (Macedonia), Burmese (Myanmar), Nepali (Nepal), Serbian (Serbia) and Urdu (Pakistan).

Download Trusted Contacts for iPhone on the App Store or for Android on the Play Store. If you already have the Android app installed, make sure you’re using the latest version of the app (version 1.5).


Trusted Contacts now on iOS

Jul 25 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  maps

Last December on Android we introduced the Trusted Contacts app, a new way for you to let your friends and family know you’re safe. Loved ones can request your location––even if your phone is offline or you can’t get to it. You can also proactively share your location in everyday or emergency situations. Now we’re bringing Trusted Contacts to iOS—so no matter what kind of device you’re using, you can be a little more at ease.

We’ve also made some updates for Android users to make it even easier to feel safe and give your loved ones peace of mind.

TrustedContactsiOSGIF

Control how quickly your location is shared

In preparation for a situation where you might need help but can’t answer your phone—imagine you get lost while hiking and lose service—you can choose how long to wait before your location is automatically shared with a trusted contact who asks for your location. Previously set to five minutes by default, you can now choose to share immediately or wait up to an hour.

Add trusted contacts by phone number

You can now add trusted contacts by phone number, as well as by email address. When you type in a phone number, an SMS is sent to that person with an invitation to connect. If they accept, then they become a trusted contact and you'll see their name and profile picture in your app from then on.

New language support

With this update, Trusted Contacts is available in nine new languages for a total of 25 worldwide: Amharic (Ethiopia), Greek (Greece), Persian (Iran), Bahasa (Indonesia), Macedonian (Macedonia), Burmese (Myanmar), Nepali (Nepal), Serbian (Serbia) and Urdu (Pakistan).

Download Trusted Contacts for iPhone on the App Store or for Android on the Play Store. If you already have the Android app installed, make sure you’re using the latest version of the app (version 1.5).


Citymapper is launching its own bus service to fill transport gap

Jul 25 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Geoawesomeness under tags  citymapper geo news transit

Most geo companies know there’s immense value to be unlocked from the data they are generating every day, but only a few are able to recognize and act upon the opportunities that arise from those insights. Citymapper, mercifully, falls in the latter category. The London-based transit startup started out by using public data from transport […]

The post Citymapper is launching its own bus service to fill transport gap appeared first on Geoawesomeness.


Webinar Recording: Extend Crowdsourcing Solution with a Custom Workflow

Jul 25 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at GIS Cloud under tags  blog crowdsourcing solution webinar

Last week, we held a webinar showing how to make the best of your crowdsourced data using GIS Cloud. You can access the webinar recording by filling in the form below.   In the webinar, you will hear a short overview of the GIS Cloud Crowdsourcing solution shown in the previous webinar, a demo of...


What’s new in Scene Viewer in Enterprise 10.5.1

Jul 25 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  arcgis content arcgis enterprise arcgis enterprise 10.5.1 arcgis online arcgis platform

The release of ArcGIS Enterprise 10.5.1 introduces many new exciting features to Scene Viewer that can help you create striking and compelling scenes. We’ve added smart mapping to Scene Viewer to help you visualize your data in 3D, many new … Continue reading


Helping people in a crisis

Jul 25 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  maps search

In times of crisis, access to timely, actionable information is crucial. Working alongside trained responders and volunteers on the ground, technology plays a vital role in providing information to help keep you and loved ones safe and informed. SOS alerts is a new set of features in Google Search and Maps to help you quickly understand what’s going on and decide what to do during a crisis.

How SOS Alerts Work

During a crisis, you may see an SOS Alert at the top of search results when searching for the incident or location. You’ll see maps, top stories and—when available—authoritative local information such as emergency phone numbers, websites, and translations of useful phrases. Depending on how close you are to the affected area, you may also get a notification on your mobile device that directs you to this information.

If you’re outside of the affected area, you may still want information about the crisis. Searches for relevant terms (like the name of the event or the location) will also show an SOS Alert that provides a timely overview of the situation, in addition to features such as donation opportunities.

sos

Google Maps on mobile can also show SOS Alerts. In Maps, you’ll see a specific icon on the map and a tappable card with more information about the crisis, such as helpful phone numbers and websites. The map will also include real-time updates, like road closures and traffic and transit updates.

sos-maps

As we’ve developed our crisis response products, we’ve worked closely with organizations and government agencies that are on the front lines of relief efforts, including the Red Cross, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration and many others. "Radio and television were once the only channels to quickly provide information in an emergency, but the internet and mobile phones have become increasingly important,” said Robert Glenn, Director at FEMA.

In addition to SOS Alerts and other crisis response features—including Google Person Finder, Google Crisis Map and Google Public Alerts—our philanthropic arm Google.org provides grants and volunteers for communities impacted by crises. We hope you never need to use crisis response features, but if you do, they’re designed to help keep you, and those you love, safe and informed.


Helping people in a crisis

Jul 25 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  maps search

In times of crisis, access to timely, actionable information is crucial. Working alongside trained responders and volunteers on the ground, technology plays a vital role in providing information to help keep you and loved ones safe and informed. SOS alerts is a new set of features in Google Search and Maps to help you quickly understand what’s going on and decide what to do during a crisis.

How SOS Alerts Work

During a crisis, you may see an SOS Alert at the top of search results when searching for the incident or location. You’ll see maps, top stories and—when available—authoritative local information such as emergency phone numbers, websites, and translations of useful phrases. Depending on how close you are to the affected area, you may also get a notification on your mobile device that directs you to this information.

If you’re outside of the affected area, you may still want information about the crisis. Searches for relevant terms (like the name of the event or the location) will also show an SOS Alert that provides a timely overview of the situation, in addition to features such as donation opportunities.

search-alert_1100px.gif

Google Maps on mobile can also show SOS Alerts. In Maps, you’ll see a specific icon on the map and a tappable card with more information about the crisis, such as helpful phone numbers and websites. The map will also include real-time updates, like road closures and traffic and transit updates.

maps-alert_1100px.gif

As we’ve developed our crisis response products, we’ve worked closely with organizations and government agencies that are on the front lines of relief efforts, including the Red Cross, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration and many others. "Radio and television were once the only channels to quickly provide information in an emergency, but the internet and mobile phones have become increasingly important,” said Robert Glenn, Director at FEMA.

In addition to SOS Alerts and other crisis response features—including Google Person Finder, Google Crisis Map and Google Public Alerts—our philanthropic arm Google.org provides grants and volunteers for communities impacted by crises. We hope you never need to use crisis response features, but if you do, they’re designed to help keep you, and those you love, safe and informed.


Helping people in a crisis

Jul 25 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  maps search

In times of crisis, access to timely, actionable information is crucial. Working alongside trained responders and volunteers on the ground, technology plays a vital role in providing information to help keep you and loved ones safe and informed. SOS alerts is a new set of features in Google Search and Maps to help you quickly understand what’s going on and decide what to do during a crisis.

How SOS Alerts Work

During a crisis, you may see an SOS Alert at the top of search results when searching for the incident or location. You’ll see maps, top stories and—when available—authoritative local information such as emergency phone numbers, websites, and translations of useful phrases. Depending on how close you are to the affected area, you may also get a notification on your mobile device that directs you to this information.

If you’re outside of the affected area, you may still want information about the crisis. Searches for relevant terms (like the name of the event or the location) will also show an SOS Alert that provides a timely overview of the situation, in addition to features such as donation opportunities.

search-alert_1100px.gif

Google Maps on mobile can also show SOS Alerts. In Maps, you’ll see a specific icon on the map and a tappable card with more information about the crisis, such as helpful phone numbers and websites. The map will also include real-time updates, like road closures and traffic and transit updates.

maps-alert_1100px.gif

As we’ve developed our crisis response products, we’ve worked closely with organizations and government agencies that are on the front lines of relief efforts, including the Red Cross, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration and many others. "Radio and television were once the only channels to quickly provide information in an emergency, but the internet and mobile phones have become increasingly important,” said Robert Glenn, Director at FEMA.

In addition to SOS Alerts and other crisis response features—including Google Person Finder, Google Crisis Map and Google Public Alerts—our philanthropic arm Google.org provides grants and volunteers for communities impacted by crises. We hope you never need to use crisis response features, but if you do, they’re designed to help keep you, and those you love, safe and informed.