GIS News

Publishing tiles from features: efficient, automatic, and economical

Jul 06 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  arcgis online

With the June 2017 ArcGIS Online release, tile layers have evolved; When publishing hosted tile layers from hosted feature layers, you can create tiles automatically. Choosing automatic means you don’t have to worry about building your tile cache ahead of … Continue reading


Building a map for everyone

Jul 06 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  maps

Many of us take for granted simple things like walking through a doorway, taking the stairs to the next floor, or always having a comfortable seat at a restaurant table. But for tens of millions of people worldwide, those very things aren’t possible unless a place has a wheelchair accessible entrance, elevator or accessible seating. Today we’re introducing a new way to add accessibility details about places to Google Maps and Search.

For those like Luis Duran, who are passionate about helping people better navigate and explore his city––this tool is for you. When you want to share accessibility information about a place or add details about many places quickly, just open Google Maps on Android, open the main menu, and then tap “Your contributions.” Tap “Uncover missing info” and sort by “accessibility” to find places around you that are missing this kind of information so you can start filling it in. You can also sort by different categories in case you have other information to add as well.

MobileAccessibility

When you need to find out whether a place you’re planning to visit has any of these accessibility features, just find the place on Google Maps (desktop, mobile) or Search (mobile), open the business listing, tap the two-line description, and then scroll down to the accessibility section. From here, you can also add your accessibility and other local knowledge by tapping “Know what features this place has?”

AccessibilityMaps_Screenshot.png

The accessibility attributes you can choose from include: wheelchair-accessible entrances, wheelchair-accessible elevators, wheelchair-accessible seating, and wheelchair-accessible parking. Unsure of how to answer these questions? Here’s a handy guide. If you want to find other Google Maps users who are equally passionate about sharing their knowledge of the world, join the Local Guides program.

With the help of users, we’ve been able to add accessibility information to nearly 7 million places around the world. By sharing your local knowledge, you’re helping us get even closer to enabling everyone, everywhere to easily discover and explore the places that best suit their individual needs.


Building a map for everyone

Jul 06 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  maps

Many of us take for granted simple things like walking through a doorway, taking the stairs to the next floor, or always having a comfortable seat at a restaurant table. But for tens of millions of people worldwide, those very things aren’t possible unless a place has a wheelchair accessible entrance, elevator or accessible seating. Today we’re introducing a new way to add accessibility details about places to Google Maps and Search.

For those like Luis Duran, who are passionate about helping people better navigate and explore his city––this tool is for you. When you want to share accessibility information about a place or add details about many places quickly, just open Google Maps on Android, open the main menu, and then tap “Your contributions.” Tap “Uncover missing info” and sort by “Accessibility” to find places around you that are missing this kind of information so you can start filling it in. You can also sort by different categories in case you have other information to add as well.

MobileAccessibility

When you need to find out whether a place you’re planning to visit has any of these accessibility features, just find the place on Google Maps (desktop, mobile) or Search (mobile), open the business listing, tap the two-line description, and then scroll down to the accessibility section. If we know the place lacks a feature, you'll see a no symbol next to it. From here, you can also add your accessibility and other local knowledge by tapping “Know what features this place has?”

AccessibilityMaps_Screenshot.png

The accessibility attributes you can choose from include: wheelchair-accessible entrances, wheelchair-accessible elevators, wheelchair-accessible seating, and wheelchair-accessible parking. Unsure of how to answer these questions? Here’s a handy guide. If you want to find other Google Maps users who are equally passionate about sharing their knowledge of the world, join the Local Guides program.

With the help of users, we’ve been able to add accessibility information to nearly 7 million places around the world. By sharing your local knowledge, you’re helping us get even closer to enabling everyone, everywhere to easily discover and explore the places that best suit their individual needs.


Building a map for everyone

Jul 06 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  maps

Many of us take for granted simple things like walking through a doorway, taking the stairs to the next floor, or always having a comfortable seat at a restaurant table. But for tens of millions of people worldwide, those very things aren’t possible unless a place has a wheelchair accessible entrance, elevator or accessible seating. Today we’re introducing a new way to add accessibility details about places to Google Maps and Search.

For those like Luis Duran, who are passionate about helping people better navigate and explore his city––this tool is for you. When you want to share accessibility information about a place or add details about many places quickly, just open Google Maps on Android, open the main menu, and then tap “Your contributions.” Tap “Uncover missing info” and sort by “Accessibility” to find places around you that are missing this kind of information so you can start filling it in. You can also sort by different categories in case you have other information to add as well.

MobileAccessibility

When you need to find out whether a place you’re planning to visit has any of these accessibility features, just find the place on Google Maps (desktop, mobile) or Search (mobile), open the business listing, tap the two-line description, and then scroll down to the accessibility section. If we know the place lacks a feature, you'll see a no symbol next to it. From here, you can also add your accessibility and other local knowledge by tapping “Know what features this place has?”

AccessibilityMaps_Screenshot.png

The accessibility attributes you can choose from include: wheelchair-accessible entrances, wheelchair-accessible elevators, wheelchair-accessible seating, and wheelchair-accessible parking. Unsure of how to answer these questions? Here’s a handy guide. If you want to find other Google Maps users who are equally passionate about sharing their knowledge of the world, join the Local Guides program.

With the help of users, we’ve been able to add accessibility information to nearly 7 million places around the world. By sharing your local knowledge, you’re helping us get even closer to enabling everyone, everywhere to easily discover and explore the places that best suit their individual needs.


Textron’s RemoteView Now Available as a Cloud-Based Solution in RVcloud 1.3

Jul 06 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at GISCafe Voice under tags  big data cloud data esri geospatial

Textron Systems Geospatial Solutions, announced the availability of the latest release of RVcloud, the web-based version of its geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) software, RemoteView. Many of the same capabilities and features found in RemoteView are offered in RVcloud 1.3 as a cloud-based solution. RVcloud offers a broad set of features designed so users can view and […]


Virtualizing ArcGIS Pro Leveraging Citrix AppDisk

Jul 06 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  appdisk arcgis pro citrix rendering uncategorized

Here at ESRI’s Performance Engineering Department in Redlands California, we have received multiple requests to virtualize ArcGIS Pro and ArcGIS Desktop. While ArcGIS Pro can be easily virtualized with leading virtualization vendors, we noticed our customers looking deeper into virtualization … Continue reading


What’s New for Displaying Imagery in ArcGIS Online (June 2017)?

Jul 06 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  arcgis online classify dra gamma histogram stretch

The June 2017 update of ArcGIS Online includes some useful capabilities for displaying imagery and raster datasets which contain raster data within imagery.  These capabilities give you greater control for visualizing the information contained in your image services. When we … Continue reading


Three Ways to Get Jupyter Notebooks and the ArcGIS API for Python

Jul 06 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  analysis & geoprocessing arcgis api for python arcgis enterprise arcgis online arcgis pro

Jupyter Notebooks have become a crucial tool in the Python and Data Science communities over the past years. Their seamless integration with some of the most important Python libraries and their interesting structure that encourages efficient prototyping and visualization have made Jupyter … Continue reading


ArcGIS API for JavaScript Versions 4.4 and 3.21 Are Here!

Jul 05 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  arcgis api for javascript arcgis online developer javascript jsapi4

The latest releases of the ArcGIS API for JavaScript are packed with useful new enhancements and capabilities. Version 4.4 gives you more control over visualizing and interacting with 3D data, includes deeper web map support, and brings in OGC layer … Continue reading


ArcGIS Pro SDK Updates at 2.0

Jul 05 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  .net analysis & geoprocessing app developers apps arcgis pro

With the new ArcGIS Pro SDK for .NET 2.0 release, there are some important changes to note which are outlined in this post.  For a summary of What’s New at 2.0, see this earlier post. The following are changes regarding … Continue reading