GIS News

Jun 30 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  analysis & geoprocessing app developers data science jupyter notebook pandas

Five Tips To Get You Started With Jupyter Notebook We’ve discussed a few reasons to use Jupyter Notebooks as a GIS user. From visualization of your data to the recent integration with the ArcGIS platform, Jupyter Notebooks are quickly becoming a … Continue reading


What’s new in Insights for ArcGIS 2.0

Jun 30 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  arcgis enterprise arcgis enterprise 10.5.1 insights insights 2.0 insights for arcgis

Insights for ArcGIS just got better! In the 2.0 release, you get optimized analysis tools to reveal more of the patterns, trends, and relationships that are hidden in your data. Now you can do powerful exploratory analysis faster and easier … Continue reading


Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS now supports Custom Widgets in ArcGIS Enterprise 10.5.1

Jun 30 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  app developers application builder apps arcgis 10.5.1 arcgis enterprise

Great news!! With the release of ArcGIS Enterprise 10.5.1, Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS embedded within the Portal for ArcGIS component now supports custom widgets. This means that you can now leverage custom widgets within the Web AppBuilder builder environment. Portal … Continue reading


Pride 2017: Show love, show progress, #ShowUp

Jun 30 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  diversity maps search

Growing up in Chandigarh, India, a small, conservative city about five hours north of New Delhi, I knew early on that something about me was different. After undergrad, I moved to Champaign, IL to get a master’s degree in engineering, leaving behind the hustle and bustle of India for a small, quiet university town in the Midwest. My newfound independence abroad gave me the space to confront and accept my difference—and come out as gay.

During my first summer in the U.S., I visited Boystown in Chicago, one of the most famous gay neighborhoods in the country. It was a bright summer day and the streets were packed with smiling, laughing people from across the LGBTQ community. It was only a matter of seconds before my friends and I got caught up in the excitement and camaraderie of the place. For the first time, I felt I could be myself.

When I joined Google, I was excited to find a community of LGBTQ Googlers and allies who celebrate Pride across the world, and not just by marching in parades (although we do lots of that, too). As a company, we want to make sure our products help LGBTQ people feel they can be themselves, whether they’re in Chandigarh or Chicago.

lgbt_parade.png
From displaying Pride parade routes in Maps, to the fifth consecutive year of YouTube’s #ProudToBe campaign, 2017 was all about connecting people with local Pride events and sharing experiences across the globe.

In addition to #ProudToBe, which encourages people to share their stories and connect with others around the world, YouTube made a number of commitments to continue supporting the LGBTQ community and shared a video celebrating Pride and all the great LGBTQ YouTube Creators.

#ProudToBe: Celebrate Brave Voices this Pride

Google My Business made it easier for merchants worldwide to let people know their business is “LGBTQ-friendly” or a “Transgender Safe Space.” Once merchants opt into these attributes, they’re shown on business listings in Google Maps and Search to signal to potential visitors that their establishment respects and treats all people equally.

LGBT_highlight mobile_1850.png

In New York, Senator Chuck Schumer announced a $1 million Google.org grant to record critical moments in LGBTQ history, including the night of the 1969 Stonewall Uprising. The Stonewall Uprising is important to the ongoing road to civil rights for LGBTQ communities around the world—and its message is as resonant and necessary today as it was in 1969.

Schumer-pride.jpg
US Senator Chuck Schumer announcing a Google.org grant to the LGBT Community Center of New York City in support of the Stonewall National Monument

And we launched #ShowUp, a project designed to help people take action in support of the LGBTQ community at a local level. By entering their zip code on the #ShowUp homepage, people can find the nearest parades, marches and LGBTQ-supporting nonprofits in their communities. The campaign also aims to chart progress in LGBTQ rights across eight U.S. cities by recording individual stories about why showing up matters.

We all have a reason to #ShowUp

Boystown made me feel safe to be myself. All people deserve to feel this way. At Google, we hope that, by  connecting people with local events and sharing experiences across the globe, Google can help even a few more LGBTQ people feel safe to be themselves.


Pride 2017: Show love, show progress, #ShowUp

Jun 30 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  diversity maps search

Growing up in Chandigarh, India, a small, conservative city about five hours north of New Delhi, I knew early on that something about me was different. After undergrad, I moved to Champaign, IL to get a master’s degree in engineering, leaving behind the hustle and bustle of India for a small, quiet university town in the Midwest. My newfound independence abroad gave me the space to confront and accept my difference—and come out as gay.

During my first summer in the U.S., I visited Boystown in Chicago, one of the most famous gay neighborhoods in the country. It was a bright summer day and the streets were packed with smiling, laughing people from across the LGBTQ community. It was only a matter of seconds before my friends and I got caught up in the excitement and camaraderie of the place. For the first time, I felt I could be myself.

When I joined Google, I was excited to find a community of LGBTQ Googlers and allies who celebrate Pride across the world, and not just by marching in parades (although we do lots of that, too). As a company, we want to make sure our products help LGBTQ people feel they can be themselves, whether they’re in Chandigarh or Chicago.

lgbt_parade.png
From displaying Pride parade routes in Maps, to the fifth consecutive year of YouTube’s #ProudToBe campaign, 2017 was all about connecting people with local Pride events and sharing experiences across the globe.

In addition to #ProudToBe, which encourages people to share their stories and connect with others around the world, YouTube made a number of commitments to continue supporting the LGBTQ community and shared a video celebrating Pride and all the great LGBTQ YouTube Creators.

#ProudToBe: Celebrate Brave Voices this Pride

Google My Business made it easier for merchants worldwide to let people know their business is “LGBTQ-friendly” or a “Transgender Safe Space.” Once merchants opt into these attributes, they’re shown on business listings in Google Maps and Search to signal to potential visitors that their establishment respects and treats all people equally.

LGBT_highlight mobile_1850.png

In New York, Senator Chuck Schumer announced a $1 million Google.org grant to record critical moments in LGBTQ history, including the night of the 1969 Stonewall Uprising. The Stonewall Uprising is important to the ongoing road to civil rights for LGBTQ communities around the world—and its message is as resonant and necessary today as it was in 1969.

Schumer-pride.jpg
US Senator Chuck Schumer announcing a Google.org grant to the LGBT Community Center of New York City in support of the Stonewall National Monument

And we launched #ShowUp, a project designed to help people take action in support of the LGBTQ community at a local level. By entering their zip code on the #ShowUp homepage, people can find the nearest parades, marches and LGBTQ-supporting nonprofits in their communities. The campaign also aims to chart progress in LGBTQ rights across eight U.S. cities by recording individual stories about why showing up matters.

#ShowUp Stories: Lily | Birmingham, AL

Boystown made me feel safe to be myself. All people deserve to feel this way. At Google, we hope that, by  connecting people with local events and sharing experiences across the globe, Google can help even a few more LGBTQ people feel safe to be themselves.


Pride 2017: Show love, show progress, #ShowUp

Jun 30 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  diversity maps search

Growing up in Chandigarh, India, a small, conservative city about five hours north of New Delhi, I knew early on that something about me was different. After undergrad, I moved to Champaign, IL to get a master’s degree in engineering, leaving behind the hustle and bustle of India for a small, quiet university town in the Midwest. My newfound independence abroad gave me the space to confront and accept my difference—and come out as gay.

During my first summer in the U.S., I visited Boystown in Chicago, one of the most famous gay neighborhoods in the country. It was a bright summer day and the streets were packed with smiling, laughing people from across the LGBTQ community. It was only a matter of seconds before my friends and I got caught up in the excitement and camaraderie of the place. For the first time, I felt I could be myself.

When I joined Google, I was excited to find a community of LGBTQ Googlers and allies who celebrate Pride across the world, and not just by marching in parades (although we do lots of that, too). As a company, we want to make sure our products help LGBTQ people feel they can be themselves, whether they’re in Chandigarh or Chicago.

lgbt_parade.png
From displaying Pride parade routes in Maps, to the fifth consecutive year of YouTube’s #ProudToBe campaign, 2017 was all about connecting people with local Pride events and sharing experiences across the globe.

In addition to #ProudToBe, which encourages people to share their stories and connect with others around the world, YouTube made a number of commitments to continue supporting the LGBTQ community and shared a video celebrating Pride and all the great LGBTQ YouTube Creators.

#ProudToBe: Celebrate Brave Voices this Pride

Google My Business made it easier for merchants worldwide to let people know their business is “LGBTQ-friendly” or a “Transgender Safe Space.” Once merchants opt into these attributes, they’re shown on business listings in Google Maps and Search to signal to potential visitors that their establishment respects and treats all people equally.

LGBT_highlight mobile_1850.png

In New York, Senator Chuck Schumer announced a $1 million Google.org grant to record critical moments in LGBTQ history, including the night of the 1969 Stonewall Uprising. The Stonewall Uprising is important to the ongoing road to civil rights for LGBTQ communities around the world—and its message is as resonant and necessary today as it was in 1969.

Schumer-pride.jpg
US Senator Chuck Schumer announcing a Google.org grant to the LGBT Community Center of New York City in support of the Stonewall National Monument

And we launched #ShowUp, a project designed to help people take action in support of the LGBTQ community at a local level. By entering their zip code on the #ShowUp homepage, people can find the nearest parades, marches and LGBTQ-supporting nonprofits in their communities. The campaign also aims to chart progress in LGBTQ rights across eight U.S. cities by recording individual stories about why showing up matters.

#ShowUp Stories: Lily | Birmingham, AL

Boystown made me feel safe to be myself. All people deserve to feel this way. At Google, we hope that, by  connecting people with local events and sharing experiences across the globe, Google can help even a few more LGBTQ people feel safe to be themselves.


AppStudio for ArcGIS version 2.0 is Now Available!

Jun 30 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  app developers apps appstudio appstudio for arcgis appstudio player

We’re pleased to announce that version 2.0 of AppStudio for ArcGIS is now available. This is our biggest release since we introduced just AppStuidio2 years ago.  We are committed to making this platform a more powerful, efficient, and user-friendly tool … Continue reading


Survey123 for ArcGIS at the 2017 Esri User Conference

Jun 30 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  app developers apps electric & gas local government mobile

Here we are once again, so close to the Esri User Conference!  Below is a list of the many places where you will be able to learn more about Survey123 for ArcGIS. Note:  The new Esri Events app has just been … Continue reading


Who would win ? Matching layer types to common workflows

Jun 30 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  arcgis online feature layers june 2017 release tile layer view layers

One of the great things about ArcGIS Online is having the multiple ways of delivering your data, it ensures that you can tailor it different ways and deliver the best experience for your many different audiences.  In a sea of … Continue reading


What’s New for Spatial Analyst in ArcGIS Pro 2.0 and 10.5.1.

Jun 30 2017 [Archived Version] □ Published at ArcGIS Blog under tags  analysis & geoprocessing arcgis spatial analyst geodesic interactive feature input spatial analyst

ArcGIS Pro 2.0 and ArcGIS 10.5.1 are now available for download! Some exciting new capabilities have been added for the Spatial Analyst extension.  Read on for more details. What’s New For these releases, we have added some new capabilities to … Continue reading