GIS News

GIScience 2016 notes

Oct 01 2016 [Archived Version] □ Published at Po Ve Sham – Muki Haklay's personal blog under tags  #gisci16 concepts conference gis giscience

The bi-annual Geographic Information Science conference is one of the focal point on the field. This year, it was held in Montreal. You can find my talk in a long and separate post. Here are some notes of talks that I took during the meeting. The conference started with reasons for the location, and a … Continue reading GIScience 2016 notes


Now you can see your Google Calendar events in Google Maps

Oct 01 2016 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  calendar maps

In our latest update, Google Maps teams up with Google Calendar to make it even easier to get where you need to go. Starting today, Android users worldwide will start to see their Google Calendar events on Google Maps. So whether you're heading to a family dinner or getting subway directions to a birthday party, you can now quickly and easily access your events directly from the map.

To ensure that your events appear on Google Maps, enter the address in the “Where” box when you create an event in Google Calendar. As long as you’re signed into both Google Calendar and Google Maps, the next time you open Google Maps you’ll see your Google Calendar events right there on the map. We've also introduced a new "Upcoming" tab where you'll see a list of your upcoming events. Simply open the sidebar menu, tap “Your Places” and then tap “Upcoming.” If you don’t want to see specific events on the map, you can hide them by tapping on the event from the map and then tapping “Dismiss.” 

Mapping-Voice-Command.gif

Seeing your Google Calendar events on Google Maps is the newest way to save time and make the most of every day.  Here's a list of existing Google Maps features that help you personalize your experience by surfacing important information where it matters most. 

Save home and work addresses

A lot of trips start or end from home and work, so save your home and work addresses to get directions in seconds. You can also add a little flair to your map by using your favorite sticker to mark home and work on the map. Search for “Home” in Google Maps or open “Your Places” to get started.

Label frequently visited places or upcoming destinations

Want to be able to simply say “OK Google, navigate to daycare?” You can. Just open Google Maps, search for the address you want to label, press the label button, and enter a name. The next time you type the name into the search box in Google Maps, your label will be a suggested result.

Your bookings and reservations from Gmail

When you receive confirmation emails for hotel, flight or restaurant reservations in Gmail, we show that information in Google Maps for easy access when on the go. These events also appear in the new “Upcoming” tab in “Your Places.”

See your Google contacts on the map

Your Google contacts will appear on Google Maps as well. Rather than memorizing your coworker or cousin’s address, you can get directions by typing their name in the search box (as long as you have an address attached to their contact info).

Settings_PC.png

To manage all your personal content and how it appears on Google Maps, you can use the new personal content manager under the settings tab in the side menu. Simply toggle off what you don’t want to show and toggle on what’s most helpful to you.


Now you can see your Google Calendar events in Google Maps

Oct 01 2016 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  calendar maps

In our latest update, Google Maps teams up with Google Calendar to make it even easier to get where you need to go. Starting today, Android users worldwide will start to see their Google Calendar events on Google Maps. So whether you're heading to a family dinner or getting subway directions to a birthday party, you can now quickly and easily access your events directly from the map.

To ensure that your events appear on Google Maps, enter the address in the “Where” box when you create an event in Google Calendar. As long as you’re signed into both Google Calendar and Google Maps, the next time you open Google Maps you’ll see your Google Calendar events right there on the map. We've also introduced a new "Upcoming" tab where you'll see a list of your upcoming events. Simply open the sidebar menu, tap “Your Places” and then tap “Upcoming.” If you don’t want to see specific events on the map, you can hide them by tapping on the event from the map and then tapping “Dismiss.” 

Mapping-Voice-Command.gif

Seeing your Google Calendar events on Google Maps is the newest way to save time and make the most of every day.  Here's a list of existing Google Maps features that help you personalize your experience by surfacing important information where it matters most. 

Save home and work addresses

A lot of trips start or end from home and work, so save your home and work addresses to get directions in seconds. You can also add a little flair to your map by using your favorite sticker to mark home and work on the map. Search for “Home” in Google Maps or open “Your Places” to get started.

Label frequently visited places or upcoming destinations

Want to be able to simply say “OK Google, navigate to daycare?” You can. Just open Google Maps, search for the address you want to label, press the label button, and enter a name. The next time you type the name into the search box in Google Maps, your label will be a suggested result.

Your bookings and reservations from Gmail

When you receive confirmation emails for hotel, flight or restaurant reservations in Gmail, we show that information in Google Maps for easy access when on the go. These events also appear in the new “Upcoming” tab in “Your Places.”

See your Google contacts on the map

Your Google contacts will appear on Google Maps as well. Rather than memorizing your coworker or cousin’s address, you can get directions by typing their name in the search box (as long as you have an address attached to their contact info).

Settings_PC.png

To manage all your personal content and how it appears on Google Maps, you can use the new personal content manager under the settings tab in the side menu. Simply toggle off what you don’t want to show and toggle on what’s most helpful to you.


Has GIScience Lost its Interdisciplinary Mojo?

Sep 30 2016 [Archived Version] □ Published at Po Ve Sham – Muki Haklay's personal blog under tags  #gisci16 citizen science conference crossdisciplinary research gis

The GIScience conference is being held every two years since 2000, and it is one of the main conferences in the field of Geographic Information Science (GIScience). It is a special honour to be invited to give a keynote talk, and so I was (naturally) very pleased to get an invitation to deliver such a talk … Continue reading Has GIScience Lost its Interdisciplinary Mojo?


Now you can see your Google Calendar events in Google Maps

Sep 30 2016 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  calendar maps

In our latest update, Google Maps teams up with Google Calendar to make it even easier to get where you need to go. Starting today, Android users worldwide will start to see their Google Calendar events on Google Maps. So whether you're heading to a family dinner or getting subway directions to a birthday party, you can now quickly and easily access your events directly from the map.

To ensure that your events appear on Google Maps, enter the address in the “Where” box when you create an event in Google Calendar. As long as you’re signed into both Google Calendar and Google Maps, the next time you open Google Maps you’ll see your Google Calendar events right there on the map. We've also introduced a new "Upcoming" tab where you'll see a list of your upcoming events. Simply open the sidebar menu, tap “Your Places” and then tap “Upcoming.” If you don’t want to see specific events on the map, you can hide them by tapping on the event from the map and then tapping “Dismiss.” 

Mapping-Voice-Command.gif

Seeing your Google Calendar events on Google Maps is the newest way to save time and make the most of every day.  Here's a list of existing Google Maps features that help you personalize your experience by surfacing important information where it matters most. 

Save home and work addresses

A lot of trips start or end from home and work, so save your home and work addresses to get directions in seconds. You can also add a little flair to your map by using your favorite sticker to mark home and work on the map. Search for “Home” in Google Maps or open “Your Places” to get started.

Label frequently visited places or upcoming destinations

Want to be able to simply say “OK Google, navigate to daycare?” You can. Just open Google Maps, search for the address you want to label, press the label button, and enter a name. The next time you type the name into the search box in Google Maps, your label will be a suggested result.

Your bookings and reservations from Gmail

When you receive confirmation emails for hotel, flight or restaurant reservations in Gmail, we show that information in Google Maps for easy access when on the go. These events also appear in the new “Upcoming” tab in “Your Places.”

See your Google contacts on the map

Your Google contacts will appear on Google Maps as well. Rather than memorizing your coworker or cousin’s address, you can get directions by typing their name in the search box (as long as you have an address attached to their contact info).

Settings_PC.png

To manage all your personal content and how it appears on Google Maps, you can use the new personal content manager under the settings tab in the side menu. Simply toggle off what you don’t want to show and toggle on what’s most helpful to you.


Now you can see your Google Calendar events in Google Maps

Sep 30 2016 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  calendar maps

In our latest update, Google Maps teams up with Google Calendar to make it even easier to get where you need to go. Starting today, Android users worldwide will start to see their Google Calendar events on Google Maps. So whether you're heading to a family dinner or getting subway directions to a birthday party, you can now quickly and easily access your events directly from the map.

To ensure that your events appear on Google Maps, enter the address in the “Where” box when you create an event in Google Calendar. As long as you’re signed into both Google Calendar and Google Maps, the next time you open Google Maps you’ll see your Google Calendar events right there on the map. We've also introduced a new "Upcoming" tab where you'll see a list of your upcoming events. Simply open the sidebar menu, tap “Your Places” and then tap “Upcoming.” If you don’t want to see specific events on the map, you can hide them by tapping on the event from the map and then tapping “Dismiss.” 

Mapping-Voice-Command.gif

Seeing your Google Calendar events on Google Maps is the newest way to save time and make the most of every day.  Here's a list of existing Google Maps features that help you personalize your experience by surfacing important information where it matters most. 

Save home and work addresses

A lot of trips start or end from home and work, so save your home and work addresses to get directions in seconds. You can also add a little flair to your map by using your favorite sticker to mark home and work on the map. Search for “Home” in Google Maps or open “Your Places” to get started.

Label frequently visited places or upcoming destinations

Want to be able to simply say “OK Google, navigate to daycare?” You can. Just open Google Maps, search for the address you want to label, press the label button, and enter a name. The next time you type the name into the search box in Google Maps, your label will be a suggested result.

Your bookings and reservations from Gmail

When you receive confirmation emails for hotel, flight or restaurant reservations in Gmail, we show that information in Google Maps for easy access when on the go. These events also appear in the new “Upcoming” tab in “Your Places.”

See your Google contacts on the map

Your Google contacts will appear on Google Maps as well. Rather than memorizing your coworker or cousin’s address, you can get directions by typing their name in the search box (as long as you have an address attached to their contact info).

Settings_PC.png

To manage all your personal content and how it appears on Google Maps, you can use the new personal content manager under the settings tab in the side menu. Simply toggle off what you don’t want to show and toggle on what’s most helpful to you.


Try these new Google Maps voice commands on your next road trip

Sep 29 2016 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  maps

As we approach the end of the year, many travelers will set out on holiday road trips to visit family and friends, near and far. Whether you’re driving solo, or don’t want to assign navigator duties to your passengers, it just got easier to get around while keeping your eyes on the road, with new voice commands that are simpler than ever to use.

For the ultimate hands-free and eyes-free experience, first make sure you’ve got the latest versions of the Google Maps app and Google app for Android. Then, the next time you enter navigation mode or driving mode, you can simply say “Ok Google” followed by a voice command, without needing to tap or even look at the screen. You’ll always know when voice commands can be used in Google Maps by looking for a white microphone icon in the top right corner.

Maps_Voice Commands1.png

When you say “Ok Google," the microphone will activate and you’ll see a circle with bouncing dots – indicating that your voice command is being heard. For example, try saying “Ok Google, find gas stations," and see what happens. You can tap the circle to cancel an ongoing command. If for some reason you want to use a non-hands-free alternative to saying “Ok Google," tap the microphone and simply say “find gas stations."

Maps_Voice Commands2.png

To make sure you have things set up correctly, from navigation mode tap the overflow menu (the button with three dots), then tap “Settings," and finally, tap “'OK Google' detection." The “While driving” setting allows you to say “Ok Google” during navigation in Google Maps. If you’d like to do this anywhere on your device, you’ll need to enable the “Always on” setting (on some devices, the setting is called “From any screen”).

Maps_Voice Commands3.png

Once you’re all set up, the possibilities are endless. In addition to tried-and-true voice commands like “What’s my next turn?” and “What’s my ETA?”, you can now do things like “Show / Hide traffic," “Mute / Unmute voice guidance," and even “Avoid tolls / highways / ferries," with just the sound of your voice. If you anticipate traffic, you can say “How’s traffic ahead?” or “Show alternate routes." And if you want to add a little fun to your drive, you can say “Play some jazz," “Send a text," or maybe even “Call mom." Here’s a cheat sheet with more of the voice commands you can use in Google Maps. Safe driving, and happy road tripping!


Try these new Google Maps voice commands on your next road trip

Sep 29 2016 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  maps

As we approach the end of the year, many travelers will set out on holiday road trips to visit family and friends, near and far. Whether you’re driving solo, or don’t want to assign navigator duties to your passengers, it just got easier to get around while keeping your eyes on the road, with new voice commands that are simpler than ever to use.

For the ultimate hands-free and eyes-free experience, first make sure you’ve got the latest versions of the Google Maps app and Google app for Android. Then, the next time you enter navigation mode or driving mode, you can simply say “Ok Google” followed by a voice command, without needing to tap or even look at the screen. You’ll always know when voice commands can be used in Google Maps by looking for a white microphone icon in the top right corner.

Maps_Voice Commands1.png

When you say “Ok Google," the microphone will activate and you’ll see a circle with bouncing dots – indicating that your voice command is being heard. For example, try saying “Ok Google, find gas stations," and see what happens. You can tap the circle to cancel an ongoing command. If for some reason you want to use a non-hands-free alternative to saying “Ok Google," tap the microphone and simply say “find gas stations."

Maps_Voice Commands2.png

To make sure you have things set up correctly, from navigation mode tap the overflow menu (the button with three dots), then tap “Settings," and finally, tap “'OK Google' detection." The “While driving” setting allows you to say “Ok Google” during navigation in Google Maps. If you’d like to do this anywhere on your device, you’ll need to enable the “Always on” setting (on some devices, the setting is called “From any screen”).

Maps_Voice Commands3.png

Once you’re all set up, the possibilities are endless. In addition to tried-and-true voice commands like “What’s my next turn?” and “What’s my ETA?”, you can now do things like “Show / Hide traffic," “Mute / Unmute voice guidance," and even “Avoid tolls / highways / ferries," with just the sound of your voice. If you anticipate traffic, you can say “How’s traffic ahead?” or “Show alternate routes." And if you want to add a little fun to your drive, you can say “Play some jazz," “Send a text," or maybe even “Call mom." Here’s a cheat sheet with more of the voice commands you can use in Google Maps. Safe driving, and happy road tripping!


Try these new Google Maps voice commands on your next road trip

Sep 29 2016 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  maps

As we approach the end of the year, many travelers will set out on holiday road trips to visit family and friends, near and far. Whether you’re driving solo, or don’t want to assign navigator duties to your passengers, it just got easier to get around while keeping your eyes on the road, with new voice commands that are simpler than ever to use.

For the ultimate hands-free and eyes-free experience, first make sure you’ve got the latest versions of the Google Maps app and Google app for Android. Then, the next time you enter navigation mode or driving mode, you can simply say “Ok Google” followed by a voice command, without needing to tap or even look at the screen. You’ll always know when voice commands can be used in Google Maps by looking for a white microphone icon in the top right corner.

Maps_Voice Commands1.png

When you say “Ok Google," the microphone will activate and you’ll see a circle with bouncing dots – indicating that your voice command is being heard. For example, try saying “Ok Google, find gas stations," and see what happens. You can tap the circle to cancel an ongoing command. If for some reason you want to use a non-hands-free alternative to saying “Ok Google," tap the microphone and simply say “find gas stations."

Maps_Voice Commands2.png

To make sure you have things set up correctly, from navigation mode tap the overflow menu (the button with three dots), then tap “Settings," and finally, tap “'OK Google' detection." The “While driving” setting allows you to say “Ok Google” during navigation in Google Maps. If you’d like to do this anywhere on your device, you’ll need to enable the “Always on” setting (on some devices, the setting is called “From any screen”).

Maps_Voice Commands3.png

Once you’re all set up, the possibilities are endless. In addition to tried-and-true voice commands like “What’s my next turn?” and “What’s my ETA?”, you can now do things like “Show / Hide traffic," “Mute / Unmute voice guidance," and even “Avoid tolls / highways / ferries," with just the sound of your voice. If you anticipate traffic, you can say “How’s traffic ahead?” or “Show alternate routes." And if you want to add a little fun to your drive, you can say “Play some jazz," “Send a text," or maybe even “Call mom." Here’s a cheat sheet with more of the voice commands you can use in Google Maps. Safe driving, and happy road tripping!


Try these new Google Maps voice commands on your next road trip

Sep 29 2016 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  maps

As we approach the end of the year, many travelers will set out on holiday road trips to visit family and friends, near and far. Whether you’re driving solo, or don’t want to assign navigator duties to your passengers, it just got easier to get around while keeping your eyes on the road, with new voice commands that are simpler than ever to use.

For the ultimate hands-free and eyes-free experience, first make sure you’ve got the latest versions of the Google Maps app and Google app for Android. Then, the next time you enter navigation mode or driving mode, you can simply say “Ok Google” followed by a voice command, without needing to tap or even look at the screen. You’ll always know when voice commands can be used in Google Maps by looking for a white microphone icon in the top right corner.

Maps_Voice Commands1.png

When you say “Ok Google," the microphone will activate and you’ll see a circle with bouncing dots – indicating that your voice command is being heard. For example, try saying “Ok Google, find gas stations," and see what happens. You can tap the circle to cancel an ongoing command. If for some reason you want to use a non-hands-free alternative to saying “Ok Google," tap the microphone and simply say “find gas stations."

Maps_Voice Commands2.png

To make sure you have things set up correctly, from navigation mode tap the overflow menu (the button with three dots), then tap “Settings," and finally, tap “'OK Google' detection." The “While driving” setting allows you to say “Ok Google” during navigation in Google Maps. If you’d like to do this anywhere on your device, you’ll need to enable the “Always on” setting (on some devices, the setting is called “From any screen”).

Maps_Voice Commands3.png

Once you’re all set up, the possibilities are endless. In addition to tried-and-true voice commands like “What’s my next turn?” and “What’s my ETA?”, you can now do things like “Show / Hide traffic," “Mute / Unmute voice guidance," and even “Avoid tolls / highways / ferries," with just the sound of your voice. If you anticipate traffic, you can say “How’s traffic ahead?” or “Show alternate routes." And if you want to add a little fun to your drive, you can say “Play some jazz," “Send a text," or maybe even “Call mom." Here’s a cheat sheet with more of the voice commands you can use in Google Maps. Safe driving, and happy road tripping!


FIDA &CO. Studios presenting GIS Cloud at the Intelligent Cities Exhibition & Conference

Sep 28 2016 [Archived Version] □ Published at GIS Cloud under tags  blog egypt events fida&co; studios gis cloud

GIS Cloud’s partners, FIDA & CO. Studios (F&CS) are exhibiting and promoting GIS Cloud solutions at the leading smart and sustainable cities event in Egypt – Intelligent Cities Exhibition and Conference (ICEC 2016). The event is taking place at Fairmont Heliopolis Hotel in Cairo, Egypt, 28 – 29 of September, 2016. The two day exhibition...


Walk the Ryder Cup at Hazeltine like the pros with Street View

Sep 28 2016 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  maps sports

Earlier this year, Turner Sports approached us with an idea: Help us change the way golf fans experience the sport’s biggest event of the year, the Ryder Cup. Always up for helping users go where they’ve never gone before, we loaned Turner a Street View Trekker. They hit the links to collect hole-by-hole imagery at Minnesota’s Hazeltine National Golf Club, site of this year's tournament starting today through October 2.

Over two days, the team covered the 160-acres course.

Explore the images on Google Maps, or walk the course like the pros using theHazeltine Explorer, an interactive tour developed by Turner and Ubilabs. Along with 360-degree views, the site, built with Google Maps APIs, features custom elevation graphs for every hole, integrated video highlights and course-specific historical moments.

Fans attending the event can also make use of the Ryder Cup app’s Wayfinding feature, available on Android and iOS. Built using Google Maps APIs, the feature includes a detailed view of the course with routing instructions that account for walking paths and crosswalks. The map also displays information about on-course amenities and facilities. 




Walk the Ryder Cup at Hazeltine like the pros with Street View

Sep 28 2016 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  maps sports

Earlier this year, Turner Sports approached us with an idea: Help us change the way golf fans experience the sport’s biggest event of the year, the Ryder Cup. Always up for helping users go where they’ve never gone before, we loaned Turner a Street View Trekker. They hit the links to collect hole-by-hole imagery at Minnesota’s Hazeltine National Golf Club, site of this year's tournament starting today through October 2.

Over two days, the team covered the 160-acres course.

Explore the images on Google Maps, or walk the course like the pros using theHazeltine Explorer, an interactive tour developed by Turner and Ubilabs. Along with 360-degree views, the site, built with Google Maps APIs, features custom elevation graphs for every hole, integrated video highlights and course-specific historical moments.

Fans attending the event can also make use of the Ryder Cup app’s Wayfinding feature, available on Android and iOS. Built using Google Maps APIs, the feature includes a detailed view of the course with routing instructions that account for walking paths and crosswalks. The map also displays information about on-course amenities and facilities. 




ArcGIS API for JavaScript 4.1 and 3.18

Sep 27 2016 [Archived Version] □ Published at odoenet under tags  arcgis esri javascript

This week saw not one, but two new releases of the ArcGIS API for JavaScript. The 4.1 documentation is here. The 3.18 documentation is here. The 4.1 release includes some great new features in the MapImageLayer, 3D scenes and custom Popup capabilities. There’s even some foundation being laid with the ability to save WebScenes for...

The post ArcGIS API for JavaScript 4.1 and 3.18 appeared first on odoenet.


Walk the Ryder Cup at Hazeltine like the pros with Street View

Sep 27 2016 [Archived Version] □ Published at Maps under tags  maps sports

Earlier this year, Turner Sports approached us with an idea: Help us change the way golf fans experience the sport’s biggest event of the year, the Ryder Cup. Always up for helping users go where they’ve never gone before, we loaned Turner a Street View Trekker. They hit the links to collect hole-by-hole imagery at Minnesota’s Hazeltine National Golf Club, site of this year's tournament starting today through October 2.

Over two days, the team covered the 160-acres course.

Explore the images on Google Maps, or walk the course like the pros using theHazeltine Explorer, an interactive tour developed by Turner and Ubilabs. Along with 360-degree views, the site, built with Google Maps APIs, features custom elevation graphs for every hole, integrated video highlights and course-specific historical moments.

Fans attending the event can also make use of the Ryder Cup app’s Wayfinding feature, available on Android and iOS. Built using Google Maps APIs, the feature includes a detailed view of the course with routing instructions that account for walking paths and crosswalks. The map also displays information about on-course amenities and facilities. 





Tag cloud

.net  1500s  1600s  1700s  1800s  2016 us elections  2017  2017 esri user conference  2017 user conference  3d  3d cities  3d designs  3d gis  3d mapping  3d modeling  3d pdf  3d visualization  about data  about fme  about our customers  accessibility  administration  aec  air  air pollution  air quality  airborne lidar  aircraft tracking  airports  alabama  alaska  alternatives  amazon  analysis  analysis & geoprocessing  analytics  android  announcement  antique maps  api  app developers  apple  apple maps  application builder  apps  appstudio  appstudio for arcgis  ar  arcade  arcade expressions  arcgis  arcgis 10.5  arcgis 10.6  arcgis api for javascript  arcgis api for python  arcgis content  arcgis desktop  arcgis developer blog  arcgis developer community  arcgis earth  arcgis enterprise  arcgis enterprise 10.5.1  arcgis for emergency management  arcgis for local government  arcgis for server  arcgis for state government  arcgis hub  arcgis online  arcgis online tip  arcgis online tutorial  arcgis open data  arcgis platform  arcgis pro  arcgis pro 2.1  arcgis pro sdk  arcgis runtime  arcgis runtime sdk for .net  arcgis runtime sdk for android  arcgis runtime sdk for ios  arcgis runtime sdk for java  arcgis runtime sdk for qt  arcgis server  arcgis spatial analyst  arcgis tutorial  archaeology  architectures of participation  arcmap  arctic  art  articles  artificial intelligence  arts & culture  asset management  astronomy  auctions  augmented reality  australia  autodesk  automation  autonomous cars  autonomous vehicles  aws  ba desktop  ba mobile  ba server  ba web  ba web app  bao  bao-only  basemap  basemaps  bathymetry  bentley  bentley systems  best practices  beta  big blue thread  big data  blog  blogs  book  book reviews  books  boundless  bpl  brownfields  building information modeling  business analyst  business analyst online  business analyst web app  business development  business intelligence  ca  calendar  california  canada  career  careers  carto  cartograms  cartographic design  cartography  causes & community  children  china  christmas  cities  citizen cyberscience  citizen engagement  citizen science  citizen science association  citsci2017  city modeling  cityengine  class ii  climate change  cloud  cloud network analytics  co  collecting  collector  collector for arcgis  colorado  comics  community  community analyst  community basemaps  community development  community maps  comprehensive planning  concepts  conference  conferences  configurable apps  conflicts  conservation  consumer  contest  conversion  crowd source  crowdsourced geographic information  crowdsourcing  cultural heritage  dashboard  data  data and analysis  data science  data visualization  data visualizations  december 2017 release  defense  dem  demo  demographic  demographic data  demographic reports  demographics  denmark  design  developer  developers  devsummit  dg  digital transformation  digitalglobe  disaster relief  disasters  dji  dojo  download  drinking water  drone  drone mapping  drone2map  drones  earth observation  earth observatory  earthquakes  ecology  editing  education  election maps  election results  elections  electoral districts  electric & gas  elevation  embed  emergency management  emergency response  emerging business  entertainment  environment  environmental  environmental information  environmental justice  environmental justice in action  epa's new england  epa connect  esa  esri  esri data  esri demographics  esri global demographics  esri startup program  esri_landscape  europe  event  events  events and announcements  exhibitions  explorer  explorer for arcgis  export  extreme citizen science  facebook  falcon  fantasy  fantasy map design  fantasy maps  feature layers  featured  field gis  fires  florida  fme 2017  fme cloud  fme desktop  fme evangelist  fme server  fme uc  food  forestry  fracking  fractracker alliance  funny  gadgets  gas  geo business  geo news  geocoding  geodata  geodesign  geodev  geography  geoinformatics  geoint  geology  geomatics  geoplanner  geoprocessing  geospatial  geospatial web  geotrends  geotrends2017  gerrymandering  gift guides  gis  gis cloud  gis day  gis day contest  gis usability  giscience  global demographics  global warming  globemaking  globes  gnss  google  google cloud  google earth  google in asia  google in europe  google maps  google vr  gores  government  gps  greening the apple  groundwater  guest commentaries  guest posts  habitat  hackathon  handhelds  hardware  health  healthy waters  here  history  history of cartography  holidays  housekeeping  how to?  human geography  human health  hurricane harvey  hurricane maria  hurricanes  hydro  image-delivery software  imagery  in car navigation  india  indigenous  indoor location technology  indoor mapping  industry  industry focus  infographics  infrastructure  insights  insights for arcgis  integrated gis solutions  intelligence  intelligent cities  internet access  internet of things  interview  ios  iphone  it all starts with science  java  javascript  jsapi4  june 2017 release  land use  landsat  landscape  laser radar  lbs  learn arcgis  libraries  lidar  living atlas  living atlas community webinar  living atlas of the world  living atlas webinar  living atlas website  local  local government  location  location-based marketing  location-based services  location analytics  location based sensor fusion  location based services  location intelligence  london  machine learning  managing gis  map  map collecting  map design  map editor  map errors  map projections  map services  map stores  map viewer  mapbox  mapmaking  mapping  maps  maps and literature  march 2017 release  master planning  memorabilia  microsoft  military  mobile  mobile data collection  mobile lidar  modeling  movies and television  nasa  national  national geospatial intelligence agency  national government  natural gas  nautical  navigation  navigator  navigator for arcgis  new release  new york  new york city  new york times  new zealand  news and information  nga  noaa  oceans  oceans & maritime  offbeat  offline  ogc  oh  ohio  oil  oil and gas  open data  open source  opengeo  openstreetmap  operations dashboard  operations dashboard for arcgis  opinions  our perspectives  our planet, our home  pa  papers  participatory gis  pennsylvania  people  performance  petroleum  photogrammetry  photos  pictorial maps  pipelines  pitney bowes  planet labs  podcast  politics  pollution  pop-ups  population  portal  portal for arcgis  ppgis  precisionhawk  press relase  privacy  programming  public health  public safety  puerto rico  python  qml  qt  r  railroads  railways  raster  raster analysis  reddit  regional planning  regulation  remote sensing  renderers  rendering  renewable energy  research  research projects  resilient cities  risk  risk assessment  satellite  satellite based tracking  satellite imagery  satellites  scenarios  scene layer  scene viewer  schools  sciences  search  security  self-driving cars  self driving car  sensors  september 2017 release  services  situational awareness  situational intelligence  small sats  smart cities  smart mapping  smartphones  snapchat  social media  software  solutions  spatial analysis  spatial analyst  spatial analytics  spatial data  spatial statistics  spatial vision  sports  ssamymlgp  standards  start-ups  startups  state  state government  stem  storm surge  story map  story map cascade  story map journal  story map tip  story map tour  story map tutorial  story maps  storytelling with maps  strava  street view  subsurface utilities  suitability  suitability modeling  survey  survey123  survey123 for arcgis  surveying  sustainable development  symbology  symbols  teaching  team  technology  telecommunications  templates  teramaps  texas  the arcgis book  the industry  time  tips  tips and tricks  tl;dr  tomtom  topcon  topgeo  toponyms  training  transit  transportation  travel  trends  tube  tutorial  tutorials  twitter  typescript  uas  uav  uavs  uber  uk  unassigned  uncategorised  uncategorized  unusual maps  updates  urban planning  us  usa  usability  use case  use cases  user conference  usgs  utilities  utility geographic information systems  utility network  variants  vector  vector basemap  vector basemaps  vector tile  vgi  virtual reality  virtualization  vision  visualization  volunteered geographic information  vr  waldseemüller  washington post  waste  wastewater  water  water resources  water utilities  weather  weather and climate  web  web appbuilder  web appbuilder for arcgis  web appbuilder for arcgis developer edition  web applications  web apps  web gis  web map  web mapping  web services  webinar  webinar recording  what's new  what's new december 2016  what's new march 2017  whats new december 2017  whats new in world street map  whats new september 2017  wildfires  wildlife  windows 10  workforce  workforce for arcgis  workshop  world imagery  wv  xkcd  year in infrastructure 2016  youtube